Men shackled by emotional and cultural barriers

Men shackled by emotional and cultural barriers

By on Aug 4, 2017 in Psychology

Photo: istock

Photo: istock © remains with original publisher

Men shackled by emotional and cultural barriers

This article is written in response to Journalist, Michael Short’s, recollection that he suppressed the memory of childhood sexual abuse for more than 35 years, and in context of the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse.

It seeks to raise questions about the interplay of consciousness, memory and cultural conditioning.

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Reading Michael Short’s recent recollection that he suppressed the memory of childhood sexual abuse for more than 35 years, and the disclosures of similar experiences Michael’s writing prompted in others, led me to wonder – why does this happen? Why are such pivotal memories wiped from the blackboard of our conscious awareness and then later recalled due to a triggering event?

And why is this a common experience, particularly for men?

Let me be clear. I am not talking about recovered memories, which are allegedly recalled through therapeutic techniques. And I am not talking about the idea that traumatic memories are repressed as a coping mechanism.

I want to ask different questions…

Click here to read the rest of the article as published by The Age and Sydney Morning Herald

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Dana MeadsDana Meads is a Melbourne-based writer, with a special interest in health, psychology, politics and culture. 

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